Proposing new laws through petition

  • Who can help me:
    Competent court of administrative procedure
  • Who is responsible:
    Parliament
  • Find it in the Law:
    Law on Legislative Initiatives
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Would you like to propose a new law, but aren’t sure where to begin? You should know that there is a Law on Legislative Initiatives which outlines the ways that citizens can propose new legislation. First, you can initiate legislative changes by lobbying delegated representatives in political institutions – members of parliament, the government or the president (if the area is related to the president’s scope of work). Nevertheless, according to the Law on Legislative Initiatives, you can also force a law to be reviewed in parliament by gathering 10.000 signatures in a petition. You can either force parliament to work on a draft that is already prepared or propose that the Assembly writes one. The legislative initiative should have a representative (either an individual or an organization).

You should first notify the Parliament of your initiative so that it is officially registered. You then have six months to collect the signatures (including name and surname, personal number and place of birth of signatories). The list of signatures will be verified by the Central Election Commission within 15 days. A final approved draft law is then submitted to the President of the Assembly. The Assembly can refuse a legislative proposal if it goes against the basic principles of the Constitution. In case the law fulfills all criteria, its review will then go through the standard Rules of Procedure for new legislation.

If parliament rejects a petition initiative, the decision can be appealed at a competent court dealing with administrative procedures.

  

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